Normal people

We have a 6 ft by 9 ft ledge in our house that sits over our front door and can only be accessed through an upstairs closet. It’s a small room, really, open on one side to the entry way and totally useless.  I’ve filled it with plants.  One day my son asked me “What would normal people do with a space like that?”

Not Normal

Not Normal

I’ve now had the privilege of having a few dozen complete strangers read and review my three novels.  Seeing my stories work, or not, through their eyes has been one of the most exciting things in my life.  I cannot begin to tell you what a growing experience this writing thing has been.  Sometimes a particular comment in a review overwhelms me, but none has more than the offhand remark of av0415 in her review of x0 on Library Thing.

“It’s quite different from normal books.” That’s just what she said.  “Normal books.”

It seems that with each novel I write, I have some sort of new personal confidence crisis.  I’m about 1/6 of the way into c3 (cee cubed), the fourth novel in this collection, and I am having my crisis already.  This one has to do with my writing style being too inaccessible. I change points of view too often and jump around too much and my last novel z2 took this even further than the first two books. I need to write more like everybody else.

So thank you, so very much, av0415 whoever you are. Thank you for reminding me of my son’s question long ago.  For although my son apologized quickly for any implied insult, he was astute enough to know how inwardly pleased I really was. Yes, I am happy that I don’t decorate like everyone else. Or dress or think or live in a way that is too easily described as normal.  And although I do want my books to be read and enjoyed by many, I am not trying to write them to be read and enjoyed by all. I need to remember that.

These aren’t normal books.  They aren’t written by a normal person. It’s okay. If your particular lack of normal has a common wavelength with mine, then you might enjoy these non-normal tales and that would be great.  But if you don’t, it’s fine too. We’re all not normal in our own way.

ranked #4!

New note  — before the day was out I ended up #4 in political fiction, at least for awhile.  The next giveaway of z2 on kindle will be March 16 & 17.

Today I promote z2 in a free giveaway and Amazon ranks these free books by how fast they are flying off of the shelves. Breaking into the top 100 for your genre is very good. No, z2 has not yet done this, not  for science fiction.  However … I forgot that I also listed it as political fiction and guess what.  I’m number 14 in political fiction, on the top page with a wild assortment of novels.  Check me out here!

First Review for z2

Waiting for that first review to come from somewhere, anywhere, is one scary experience.
Luckily, z2 is off to a fine start, and I am posting fellow author Bob Craton’s review of z2 below.
I should add that I don’t know Bob personally, but I am a fan of his books, we’ve exchanged some emails on writing websites, and I very much appreciate that he seems to enjoy my books too.

Bob Craton‘s review is posted on Goodreads here and Amazon here.

Feb 06, 13
5 of 5 stars false
Read from February 01 to 05, 2013

I’m a big fan of this author’s first two books, ‘x0’ and ‘y1’, so it is no surprise that I love this third volume of the series. Once again she has put together a marvelous tale. I don’t know of anyone doing better in the genre of magical realism than she does. All of the books involve the fictional Zeitman family with a different member featured in each volume — Lola (wife/mother) in the first, Zane (son) in the second, and now Alex (husband/father). Each character is a very real and believable person who just happens to have a special ability.

The author is unafraid of tackling serious social problems, in this case racism, and she does so without being preachy. She also does a lot of research so the facts in the ‘realism’ part of magical realism are always accurate. (That makes those of us who just make stuff up as we go along feel lazy.) I don’t give spoilers so all I will say about the story is that there are two subplots, each with its own set of characters, and that the story-lines merge and the characters meet each other.

As before, the ending is very upbeat and optimistic. As a skeptic, I would not expect such happy endings in the real world. In the Zeitman family’s world, however, the conclusion shows the way things could be — and should be. I find this approach very encouraging.