And the Hate Goes On …

enhanced-buzz-wide-28244-1347483313-2It’s hard to be quiet after you turn on the news and listen to some of the surreal reactions to the terrorist attacks in Paris and Lebanon. For starters, members of the very same political party that once used the word treason to describe any one who disagreed with George Bush’s invasion of Iraq,  on the grounds that they were criticizing U.S. foreign policy at a crucial time, have now doubled down on criticizing the current president to the point of making his job unduly difficult. And they are doing this primarily to advance their own political careers. Hypocrisy only begins to describe the situation.

But what they are saying is even more disturbing.

Governors of some 30 states have now said they will not accept new refugees. Tennessee House GOP Caucus Chairman Glen Casada believes the time has come for the National Guard to round up any Syrian refugees who have recently settled in his state and to stop any additional ones from entering. His words: We need to activate the Tennessee National Guard and stop them from coming in to the state by whatever means we can.”

Roanoke Mayor David Bowers cited the use of internment camps for Japanese-Americans during World War II to justify suspending the relocation of Syrian refugees to his city in Virginia and requested that all Roanoke Valley agencies stop Syrian refugee assistance. His words: I’m reminded that President Franklin D. Roosevelt felt compelled to sequester Japanese foreign nationals after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, and it appears that the threat of harm to America from Isis now is just as real and serious as that from our enemies then.

Let’s take a breath and look at the facts.

growing bolder 5Syrian and Iraqi refugees are already the most heavily vetted category of people to enter the U.S. Their screening already includes background checks by the FBI and DHS, and seven other federal agencies. Furthermore, the U.S. has taken in only about 2,200 Syrian refugees out of the more than 4 million fleeing the war-torn nation. In the Middle East, America’s ally Turkey has done three orders of magnitude better, taking in more than 2 million of its neighbors. Tiny Lebanon is trying to absorb more than 1 million Syrians, and Jordan has more than 650,000. And by the way, only 30 of those Syrian refugees settled in the nervous state of Tennessee.

President Obama has called for us to take in at least 10,000 more refugees over the next fiscal year, compared to Germany’s 800,000, and brave France’s commitment to accept another 30,000 even after the attacks. An embarrassingly wide array of our politicians are throwing public tantrums about allowing even this small amount of highly vetted and desperate people to come into our allegedly welcoming and compassionate country.

Do the American’s saying these things listen to themselves? Do they not realize that they sound like the villains in a barely believable movie?

My novel z2 contains a lot of information about the history of immigration law in the United States but no one story moved me as much as this:

In 1939, the United States denied entry to twenty-thousand Jewish children fleeing Nazi Germany, even though families had already been found here to care for each and every child. The reason for denying these children asylum? Admitting them would have forced us to exceed our set total quota for immigrants for that year, and the rationale in Congress, where the granting of the exception was refused, was that we couldn’t just go around bending the rules every time it was convenient.

walk talk 1Let’s stop this nonsense now. History does not have to repeat itself.

Apparently political philosopher Edmund Burke never actually said the words “All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing,” although he expressed the sentiment in lengthier quotes. If you prefer a pithy summary of a call to action, listen to Plato. His words: The penalty good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men. Or Albert Einstein. His words: The world is in greater peril from those who tolerate or encourage evil than from those who actually commit it.

You and I need to speak up. Use social media like #stophatespeech and let your voice be heard. We are capable of being the good guys. Let’s start to act like it.

(For more on this subject see “I Live Here” on my “Face Painting for World Peace” blog.)

Stop

Surpemes Like the other members of the Zeitman family, Alex finds that music helps him do the extraordinary things of which he is capable. To me, this is merely interjecting a bit of realism into the plot. Music helps me stay awake late at night when I am driving. Music helps me get out of bed and face a tough day, thanks to the fact that I have an alarm tied to an mp3 player with a special selection of wake-up songs. I play one kind of music when I am cooking a big meal or doing a chore that takes extra energy, and other types when I am stressed and need to relax. I think most people use music, the right kind of music for them, to bring out their strengths and to help them do what needs to be done. Because Alex can slow time down, it is natural that he gravitates to songs that tie into this talent. Enjoy this short excerpt from z2, and the video below.

Alex stood in the parking lot with his hands full of books and supplies to bring into his classroom. School was out for the day and it was better to carry all this stuff back in now rather than deal with it in the morning when he would inevitably be running late. The heat sizzled off of the asphalt and the glare of the late afternoon sun on the windshields was blinding. He gave the car door a hard push with his knee and then he remembered. His keys were on the car seat. The locks were on. Damn.

As Diana Ross and the Supremes started singing “Stop! In the Name of Love” in his head, Alex dropped the books and thrust his hands into the narrowing opening, trying to get the gradually slowing car door to hit his arms or at least his wrists. He did not want to break a finger. The door didn’t stop, but the speed of the door became slower and slower as he thrust forward until finally it barreled into his left lower arm and he felt the pain. Ouch, that was going to cause some bruising, he thought with a wince.

He stood for a few seconds in the blinding bright shimmer of sunlight on metal and glass, and let his heart slow down and the world around him speed back up. As he bent down to pick up the books he had dropped he thought, I have got to learn more about what the hell is going on with me.

Watch the Supremes perform their hit song live on Shindig in 1965.

You might also want to check out this Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Tribute to the Supremes, and consider purchasing this song from Amazon.com.

This year October 10th lasted almost all month

I’ve taken a lot of classes in creative writing, but only one in writing poetry. The class gave me two things. (1) It firmly established that I am not a poet.  (2) It gave me Oct. 10.

Rather, it gave me a poem called “Oct. 10” about the bright blue sky of autumn and the importance of wrapping the memory of that sky close around you to bring comfort on a white winter day.  For whatever reason, that phrase stuck with me and from it I created my own personal holiday.  Every year, on or around Oct 10, wherever I have lived and whatever I have been doing, there has always been one of those gorgeous cool clear autumn days. I’d call in sick. I’d ignore household chores. It was my own personal day off, a celebration of all things beautiful, and every year I found a way to take at least part of the day and make it mine.

autumn crop for blogUntil this year. I’ve moved to a location with colder weather and far more trees. October started out cool and rainy and I was worried that my special holiday might not even happen here. I couldn’t have been more wrong. Once the rain passed, the daytime sky settled in to bright blue while the leaves around me danced from golden to orange to burgundy, and I went into holiday mode. And couldn’t come out of it.  I mean, I knew it had been over two weeks since I started celebrating, but it still felt like Oct 10 and so I spent day after day on my front porch staring at a deep blue sky. I intended to be writing, I really did. I had plenty else that needed to be done. But damn, it was Oct 10 and I needed to enjoy every bit of it.

The rain and cold finally came back of course, and today I made a nice detailed list of everything I have got to get done.  It felt good to get organized again; I’m one of those people who likes that feeling. It’s November, and time to move on. But what a great Oct. 10! I hope it lasts as long next year.

(If you like the idea of declaring a personal holiday, check out my post for 2012, when Oct 10 didn’t come until Oct. 28.)